English

Background: Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens.

Methods: Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression.

Results: 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028). Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252).

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency.

Country:
Program area:
Type:
Published Paper
Date:
October 18, 2014
English

Compared to the number of randomized evaluations that have been conducted on cash transfers in Latin America, evaluations on cash grant interventions in African settings are few. However, the recent studies that have been conducted in Africa help to answer several key questions about cash grants.

Program area:
Topics:
Type:
Brief
Date:
May 22, 2014
English

We conduct a business plan competition to determine whether survey instruments or panel judges are able to predict which participating firms will grow fastest. Participants were required to submit a simple six- to eight-page business plan and then defend that plan before a panel of three or four judges. We surveyed the pool of applicants shortly after they applied, and then one and two years after the business plan competition. We use the follow-up surveys to construct a measure of enterprise growth, and use the baseline surveys and panel scores to construct measures of the potential for growth of the enterprise. We find that a measure of ability correlates quite strongly with future growth, but that the panel scores add to predictive power even after controlling for the measure of ability and other variables from the survey. The survey questions appear to have more power to explain the variance in growth. Participants presenting before the panel were give a chance to win customized training. Fourteen months after the training, we find no positive effect of the training on growth of the business.

Country:
Type:
Working Paper
Date:
April 03, 2014
English
Accra has a vibrant private and public education sector at both the primary and preprimary levels. Attendance at preschool is exceptionally high, reflecting both strong parental beliefs in the importance of preschool and the recent government stipulation that two years of preschool should be part of the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE) structure. Despite the Government’s success in expanding public preschool provision, however, the private school industry remains very strong: an estimated 90% of preschool students in the study area of Ashaiman are attending private preschools.
 
In September and October 2013 Innovations for Poverty Action conducted a data collection exercise in the large slum area of Ashaiman, in the Greater Accra region. A representative sample of 286 household surveys, 30 headmaster surveys and 40 classroom observations were conducted with the aim of discovering the scale, cost and quality and preschool education in this area. This paper details this research and its findings.
Country:
Program area:
Type:
Report
Date:
January 01, 2014
English

Standard models of investment predict that credit-constrained firms should grow rapidly when given additional capital, and that how this capital is provided should not a§ect decisions to invest in the business or consume the capital. We randomly gave cash and in-kind grants to male- and female-owned microenterprises in urban Ghana. For women running subsistence enterprises we find no gain in profits from either treatment. For women with larger businesses we strongly reject equality of the cash and in-kind grants; only in-kind grants cause growth in profits, suggesting a flypaper e§ect whereby capital coming directly into the business sticks there, but cash does not. The results for men also suggest a lower impact of cash, but di§erences between cash and in-kind grants are less robust. There is suggestive evidence that the di§erence in the e§ects of cash and in-kind grants is associated more with lack of self-control than with external pressure. 

Country:
Type:
Published Paper
Date:
January 01, 2014
English

The investment decisions of small scale farmers in developing countries are conditioned by their financial environment. Binding credit market constraints and incomplete insurance can limit investment in activities with high expected profits. We conducted several experiments in northern Ghana in which farmers were randomly assigned to receive cash grants, grants of or opportunities to purchase rainfall index insurance, or a combination of the two. Demand for index insurance is strong, and insurance leads to significantly larger agricultural investment and riskier production choices in agriculture. The binding constraint to farmer investment is uninsured risk: When provided with insurance against the primary catastrophic risk they face, farmers are able to find resources to increase expenditure on their farms. Demand for insurance in subsequent years is strongly increasing with the farmer’s own receipt of insurance payouts, with the receipt of payouts by others in the farmer’s social network and with recent poor rain in the village. Both investment patterns and the demand for index insurance are consistent with the presence of important basis risk associated with the index insurance, imperfect trust that promised payouts will be delivered and overweighting recent events.

Country:
Type:
Published Paper
Date:
December 01, 2013

Pages