August 07, 2019
Accra, Ghana

Reforming the Education Sector for Effective Service Delivery: Embracing Innovations
 

Improving education sector performance is a key policy priority for the Government of Ghana, and the Ministry of Education is currently undergoing a sector reform towards achieving effectiveness in education services delivery. To ensure that well-intentioned policy goals translate into improved learning outcomes, decision-makers are eager to: (1) learn about interventions and innovative practices that have proven to work; and (2) use such evidence and innovative solutions to improve planning and education services delivery.

2019's Evidence Summit, which forms part of the National Education Week (NEW), was held on August 7. The event brought together policymakers, researchers, and practitioners to: a) share rigorous evidence that has been collected about innovative approaches to improve learning outcomes, in Ghana and internationally; and b) identify ways in which evidence can be used to drive the implementation of priority reforms, and facilitate better decision-making processes.

The Evidence Day of NEW provides a platform to discuss best practices and to draw out lessons for policy and education planning. Papers were presented, linked to this year’s NEW theme, across the sub-sectors of education from early grade to tertiary level. This assisted the policymakers and sector practitioners with evidence to inform reform, planning and policy implementation for improved service delivery.

More information about the summit's themes and the call for papers is available here

Summit Structure and Goals

The evidence summit aimed to:

  • Share results of high-quality research on what works in education from researchers and academics doing work in Ghana and internationally.
  • Engage and inform stakeholders of emerging practices and innovations to improve education services delivery and attain quality education.
  • Translate evidence into action by highlighting policy recommendations to inform the technical discussions and planning process during the NEW.

Call for Papers

A Call for Papers was made to solicit an array of research work being carried out across the country and internationally. A Censor Panel of three members from MoE/GES, academia, and IPA convened to review the submissions and select high-quality studies whose lessons can inform the sector planning processes.

Papers were presented on Basic Education (including early childhood education), Secondary Education, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), Tertiary Education, and Planning and Management.

For all inquiries, please email GHA_NEW2019@poverty-action.org

Information about last year's Education Week is available here

Presentations

USAID’s Early Grade Reading and Early Grade Math Impact Evaluations: Lessons Learned
Monica Gadkari
From Mother Tongue Instruction in Complementary Education Into Official Language of Instruction in Government Schools in Ghana: Does the Pathway Make a Difference to Sustained Literacy?
Kwame Akyeampong
Nexus Between Supervision Strategies and Quality Basic Education: Study of Selected Public Basic Schools in Ghana
Peter Anti Partey
The Perils and Promises of Listening to Parents: Encountering Unexpected Barriers to Improving Preschool in Ghana
Joyce Jumpah, Sharon Wolf

* Note: Results are preliminary

The Role of Primary School Contexts in Supporting Sustained Long-Term Impacts of the “Quality Preschool for Ghana” Interventions
Edward Tsinigo, Sharon Wolf

* Note: Results are preliminary