The nationwide lockdown announced by the Indian government on March 24, 2020 in response to the COVID-19 has had a tremendous effect on the Indian economy. Labor migrants are among the most affected: usually employed in informal, low-paid jobs, they are now without work, with no social protection, no assistance from previous employers, and no network to fall back to in their 'host’ states.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
  A phone survey conducted with youth from Bihar and Jharkhand in June and July 2020 to assess how the nationwide lockdown had affected inter-state labor migrants found that:
  • Almost half (45 percent) of the respondents who resided outside of their home state in the pre-lockdown period had returned to their home state.
  • 32 percent of the respondents who had a salaried job in the pre-lockdown period had lost their jobs. Of those still employed, 37 percent were on leave, mostly unpaid.
  • 30 percent of the migrants who were still employed received support from their employers and a few withdrew money from their Provident Fund (social security) account.
  • 51 percent of migrants received government assistance, mainly food supplies. The Aapda program of the Bihar government (the state's disaster compensation scheme) reached 61 percent of migrants.
  • 31 percent of the interstate migrants did not receive any support from any source. As a result, 31 percent reported that their daily food intake was less than usual.
  • At the time of surveying, the respondents reported higher levels of anxiety and lower levels of life satisfaction than in the pre-lockdown period.
  • Among the migrants who returned home, 68 percent of male migrants wanted to re-migrate, but only 37 percent of female migrants did.

Given the particular vulnerability of elderly populations in the pandemic, due to both heightened health risks and lockdown-induced isolation, an initiative to collect COVID-19 related data grew within the Tamil Nadu Aging Panel Survey being conducted under the institutional partnershipbetween J-PAL South Asia and the Government of Tamil Nadu to study the long-term well-being of elderly individuals. 

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
April-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
 
  • Social Protection: The Government of Tamil Nadu launched two schemes for ration card-holders in the state: (1) Free rations from April to July, doubling the rice entitlement; (2) A cash transfer of Rs.1000 (about USD 14) per ration card for April and May The schemes reached most, although not all intended recipients. 
  • Food security and nutrition: At the start of the lockdown in March 2020, the elderly faced sizeable health and food-security challenges: nearly 50 percent of respondents reported not having enough resources for food in the next week. In subsequent survey rounds, it was found that the number of elderly unable to buy medicine or see a doctor since April had fallen. Food insecurity, however, had risen and was high particularly among the elderly living alone.   
  • Health knowledge and awareness: During the April phone surveys, 1.4 percent of the elderly reported having COVID-19 symptoms. Of the elderly reporting symptoms, nearly 80 percent did nothing or self-medicated. No respondent reported calling the government helpline in April; only 0.1 percent reported having called the government helpline in July. Awareness of COVID-19 spread, symptoms, and precautions was moderate in April. In July, awareness had grown among the elderly living alone, presumably as information percolates through networks.   
  • Mental health and well-being: 
    • Social connection: At the beginning of the lockdown, social interaction was low for the elderly, both in-person and remote. In April, the elderly who were living alone were less likely to have regular phone calls. By July, both regular in-person visits and calls had picked up moderately for the elderly living alone and elderly living with others. 
    • Loneliness and depression: In April, the elderly living alone were about twice as likely to indicate feelings of loneliness and depression than those living with others in their households. These indicators reflect lower loneliness and depression than those at the baseline survey. This may be due to the nature of the COVID survey (shorter and via the phone), which is less conducive to building a rapport between surveyors and respondents. As the lockdown progressed, all elderly (those living alone and those living with others) became far more likely to express feelings of loneliness and depression. This was especially true for the elderly living alone, 32 percent of whom reported often feeling lonely when asked in July.

India’s COVID-19 lockdown is widely believed to have disrupted critical health services, but its effect on non-COVID health outcomes is largely unknown. Comparing mortality trends among dialysis patients in the eight months around the lockdown with the previous year, researchers document a 64 percent increase in mortality between March and May 2020 and an estimated 22-25 percent total excess mortality between April and July 2020, the first four months after the lockdown was imposed.

Partners:
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
May-September 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
 
  • 63 percent of patients experienced a disruption to their dialysis care due to the lockdown. 42 percent of patients reported being unable to reach their hospitals due to travel barriers, 15 percent found the hospital was closed or refused to provide care, 23 percent had to switch to a different hospital from the one they typically visit, 17 percent could not obtain necessary medicines, and 11 percent faced increased hospital charges. Monthly dialysis visits decreased by 6 percent between March and April. 
  • Monthly mortality (the share of people alive who die in a month) increased sharply from 2.67 percent in March to 4.37 percent in May (a 64 percent jump) after a month of exposure to the lockdown and 3.23 percent in June, after which it returned to pre-lockdown levels. Overall, total excess mortality among dialysis patients between April and July 2020 was 22-25 percent.
  • Disruptions to care are strongly positively associated with morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality after the imposition of the lockdown, providing strong evidence that increased mortality was driven by disruptions to dialysis care. The surge in mortality was not driven by confirmed COVID-19 deaths.
  • Women and socioeconomically disadvantaged groups experienced larger increases in mortality. Disadvantaged socioeconomic groups and those living farther away from a hospital were more likely to experience disruptions to their care, which may explain their worse outcomes. Women experienced similar levels of disruptions and morbidity to men, but were less likely to be hospitalized following disruptions, which may have contributed to their higher mortality.

The Feed the Future Myanmar Agriculture Policy Support Activity (MAPSA) is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded activity, led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), in partnership with Michigan State University (MSU), that seeks to improve governance in the agricultural sector in Myanmar. MAPSA partnered with Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) to conduct six rounds of Rural-Urban Food Security Survey (RUFSS).

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Results:
Full results forthcoming
Key Findings:
 
  • COVID-19 has had strong negative impacts on income-based poverty among both rural and urban households. Losses of jobs or other income have been the main impacts.
    • Twenty percent of respondents reported their household earned no income in June.
    • USD 1.90/day poverty in the sample increased by 27 percentage points from January to June.
  • Falling into poverty was strongly associated with loss of employment and recent childbirth.
  • The poor frequently coped with income losses through loans or other credit, although between 15 and 20 percent of households also reduced their food expenditures.
  • Self-reported food insecurity experiences and inadequate dietary diversity among mothers were much more common in the urban sample, despite the rural sample being poorer.
    • In urban areas, one-quarter of respondents were worried about food quantity and quality, and one-third had inadequate diets.
  • Self-reported losses of income and jobs were strong predictors of food insecurity and inadequately diverse diets.
    • Mothers who had given birth in the past month had much less diverse diets than pregnant women.

The Feed the Future Myanmar Agriculture Policy Support Activity (MAPSA) is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded activity, led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), in partnership with Michigan State University (MSU), that seeks to improve governance in the agricultural sector in Myanmar.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Results:
Final results forthcoming
Key Findings:
Round 4 Key Findings (October 2020):
  • COVID-19 prevention measures are at their highest level since June. Almost all COVID-19 prevention measures have been applied in a larger share of communities than in any of the previous survey rounds. In nearly all communities, respondents reported restrictions on gatherings, such as weddings or other social activities, and mandates on wearing face masks outside the home. Many communities also implemented measures that interfere with employment and income generating activities; 70 percent of communities reported that residents cannot leave the village/ward for work or trade and 76 percent reported that food vendors and traders are not allowed to enter the village.
  • Community respondents perceive a quarter of households to be extremely poor. Respondents to the October round of the survey reported that on average 25 percent of households in their communities are extremely poor, which is similar to levels reported in September (27 percent), but much higher than was reported in the June/July (17 percent) and August (11 percent) rounds. Reduced income due to less work or lower wages for non-farm workers and less income from non-farm businesses are mentioned as the primary reasons for the high prevalence of extremely poor households in the most recent round.
  • Cash-based assistance reaches 90 percent of communities. In June/July, government assistance came mostly in the form of food, but since August has changed to predominantly non-food assistance. Twenty percent of communities reported receiving non-food assistance in June/July. Respondents reported in October that on average 90 percent of communities received cash or non-food assistance from the government, a level similar to that reported in September.
  • Agricultural production and marketing, particularly sales of agricultural commodities, continues to face challenges. One-third of the surveyed communities reported that the production of farmers in their community were lower than normal in October and September, compared with 48 percent of communities in June/July and 42 percent in August. Communities reported that bad weather and pests were the reasons for lower production. In October, 48 percent of communities also reported disruptions to agricultural sales, mainly due to closures of town/city markets, low output prices, insufficient traders or brokers, and other COVID-19 related mobility restrictions. This is the highest share of communities reporting disruptions since the start of the telephone survey in June/July.
  • Barriers to healthcare facility access and delays to healthcare seeking. Respondents from 11 percent of communities reported being unable to visit healthcare facilities when they wanted to, and respondents from 25 percent of communities reported postponing visits to healthcare professionals out of fear of contracting COVID-19. Additionally, 19 percent of respondents mentioned knowing people in their community who had felt ill and would normally have visited a healthcare provider but chose not to do so due to fear of being suspected of carrying COVID-19. Fortunately, fewer villages reported medication scarcity than was the case in the June/July survey round.

 

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-November 2020
Results Status:
Results
Results:
Full results forthcoming
Key Findings:
  July 2020 Key Findings:
  • Strikingly, 60 percent of mills are anticipating a revenue drop of at least 30 percent this year compared to 2019. Only 3 percent of mills are expecting an increase in revenue.
  • Just over half of the mills interviewed experienced disruptions in selling milled rice and in buying paddy. However, those impacts have lessened considerably, as only 15 percent of millers reported experiencing those disruptions in the past 30 days.
  • Almost all mills regarded byproduct sales as important to their business. Roughly half reported no changes in byproduct prices compared to 2019, but one-quarter reported price increases, while the other quarter reported decreases. Mills from Ayeyarwady have been more negatively impacted by lower byproduct prices than elsewhere.
  • For most mills, both paddy purchase and rice sales prices are now slightly higher than the 2019 average. Interestingly, prices increased more for low-quality varieties than for high-quality varieties. Margins for low-quality varieties have increased relative to 2019, while they have decreased for high-quality varieties. Thus, mills producing larger quantities of high-quality rice now may be adversely affected by lower margins.
August 2020 Key Findings:
  • 44 percent of rice millers reported challenges buying paddy and 26 percent reported disruptions to rice sales. With the timing of the survey in August, these challenges are unlikely to have been driven by the transportation restrictions that were a challenge earlier in the monsoon season.
  • 71 percent of rice mills were using some safety measures, but adoption of social distancing was near zero and use of face coverings decreased 19 percentage points from July.
  • 46 percent of mills reported lower daily throughput compared to the same time in 2019. The median decrease among those reporting lower throughput was 30 percent.
  • Milling margins increased on average in the August survey compared to July.
  • 38 percent of mills applied for new loans in the thirty days prior to interview. However, just 57 percent of those who applied were successful.

This study, led by the Asociacion Profamilia, includes the answers to an online nonprobabilistic survey (Solidarity II) carried out between April 16 and 25 and September 2020 (n=1735). It aims to estimate the changes in behavior and immediate expectations at the end of the quarantine period and compares its results with a survey performed at the beginning of the lockdown (Solidarity I).

Study Type:
Pilot
Study Timeline:
September 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
  •  Among the most common concerns are that a vaccine or treatment against the coronavirus will not arrive soon in Colombia (79%), that a vaccine or treatment will not be developed soon (79%), and that when the vaccine arrives in Colombia it will not be accessible (74%). 50% think it is likely they will receive the coronavirus vaccine when it becomes available.
  • 62% receive information about COVID-19 through social networks, 55% through official websites and 51% through television.
  • 43% mention that in their neighborhood, community, group or town they have taken measures or there have been public health/communications campaigns to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
  • 25% say that they would like to support local communities in responding to the outbreak.
  • 82% accept that most children will continue to be educated at home, and 85% believe that parents should choose whether or not to send their children to school in person.
  • 95% agree that people should be forced to wear masks outside the home.
  • 90% accept that neighborhoods, localities or municipalities experiencing outbreaks should have stricter restrictions than the country at large.
  • 86% accept that employees can choose whether they work in the office or do their work from home.
  • 44% think that people will be able to get the coronavirus vaccine in a year or year and a half.
  • 26% think that life will return to "normal" in two or more years.

This paper considers whether the COVID-19 stay-at-home order affected crimes targeting women. We use national municipal-level crime data from Mexico’s National Public Security System, which reports sexual crimes, lapses in alimony, domestic violence, and femicides. We track monthly changes in crime using an event-study design. Our results show three main patterns. First, lapses in alimony, sexual crimes, and domestic violence follow a U-shaped trend.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
January-July 2019, January-July 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
  • Lapses in alimony, sexual crimes, and domestic violence follow a U-shaped trend. Each crime declined and then rose back to their pre-COVID levels.
  • Femicides, the most violent crime against women, remained constant during the pandemic.
  • Femicides declined in municipalities with alcohol sales prohibition.

The study uses administrative data for 35 million private-sector jobs in Mexico to investigate the differences between the Great Lockdown (GL) and the Great Recession (GR). Using an event-study design, researchers observe that the GL produced more loss of employment than the GR. The researchers then document five heterogeneous facts. First, men and women were similarly affected by each crisis.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
  • Men and women were similarly affected by each crisis.
  • Both recessions impacted the youngest workers (15 to 29 years old), but the Great Lockdown also negatively impacted those over 60 years.
  • The Great Recession produced more job loss in large companies (over 1000 workers), while the effects of the Great Lockdown were greatest in small and medium-sized companies.
  • In both crises, individuals were most affected at the extremes of the income distribution.
  • The construction industry was detrimentally affected in both the Great Lockdown and Great Recession. The hospitality-focused service sector was more impacted in the Great Lockdown than the Great Recession.

Twaweza collected data on citizens’ knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) related to Covid-19 through a series of mobile phone surveys of a representative sample of the country’s adult population.

Researchers:
Partners:
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
April-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
Results for the Kenya portion of the survey are available (August 2020) here. Key findings include:  Knowledge:
  • Almost all citizens are aware of aware of COVID-19, most are very aware of it
  • Most citizens are aware of the main modes of transmission and identify public places and gatherings as the most likely places of exposure to the virus
  • Some misconceptions about COVID-19 are widely held
  • Citizens see older people, children and those with pre-existing conditions as being most at risk
  • 6 out of 10 citizens are very worried about the Coronavirus outbreak in Kenya
  • Most citizens do not feel at risk of being exposed to the Coronavirus
Response:
  • Most citizens are aware of some measures the government has taken in response to the outbreak
  • Citizens point to handwashing, masks and staying at home as actions they are taking to prevent infection
  • 2 out of 3 citizens have confidence in the government’s ability to handle the Coronavirus outbreak
  • 4 out of 10 citizens say the money they have currently available to them would only last one day if no movement is allowed
Economics and Financial Wellbeing:
  • More than half of citizens agree with the view that many people have resumed business as usual despite the outbreak
  • Citizens are more concerned about the economic implications of the Coronavirus than the health effects
  • The biggest impacts of the Coronavirus outbreak on Kenyan households have been on income and jobs
  • Half of households have seen food price increases in the previous two weeks
  • 7 out of 10 households report that their food intake has become worse in the previous month

The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on conventional crime and organized crime in Mexico City, Mexico. We use an event study for the intertemproal variation across the 16 districts (municipalities) in Mexico City for 2019 and 2020, utilizing reported crime data from the Mexico City’s Attorney General’s Office (covering domestic violence, burglary, robbery, vehicle-theft, assault-battery, homicides, kidnapping, and extortion). We find a sharp decreas

Study Type:
Quasi-experimental Analysis
Study Timeline:
January-May 2019, January-May 2020
Results Status:
Results
Results:
We find a sharp decrease on crimes related to domestic violence, burglary, and vehicle theft; a decrease during some weeks on crimes related to assaultbattery and extortion, and no effects on crimes related to robbery, kidnapping, and homicides. While our results show a decline in conventional crime during the COVID-19 pandemic, organized crime remains steady. These findings have policy implications for catastrophic events around the world, as well as possible national security issues in Mexico.

The COVID-19 pandemic hit the Peruvian Amazon in mid-March and sparked international concern about the well-being of the indigenous and non-indigenous peoples of the region. Although the two major urban centers—Iquitos and Pucallpa—received media attention, information about conditions in the many smaller rural communities along the rivers of Loreto and Ucayali regions is scarce.

Study Type:
Quasi-experimental Analysis, Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June 2020-ongoing
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
Preliminary key findings from July 2020 baseline survey:
  1. COVID-19 has spread widely in the Peruvian Amazon in two waves. Mortality was highest early in the first wave and in the Department of Loreto (primarily in the city of Iquitos).
  2. COVID-19 has been reported in many PARLAP study communities but mortality has been relatively low. Testing in communities has been limited so the actual number of cases is uncertain.
  3. Both indigenous and folk communities experienced similar prevalence of, and mortality due to COVID-19. Confirmed cases were higher in indigenous communities.
  4. Access to health care was limited (especially among indigenous communities) and rural people relied heavily on traditional remedies.
  5. Community transmission was an important potential cause of spread.
  6. Protective measures taken in communities varied - difficulties in maintaining social distance. Protective measures potentially reduced the prevalence and mortality due to COVID-19.
  7. Rural communities received limited assistance: money helpful; food helpful too, especially because prices shot up for items typically bought in cities. Some communities reported that residents contracted COVID-19 in traveling to city to pick up their government COVID-19 subsidy; this may have led to mortality.
  • 60 Decibels Logo

The research team is collecting data on the impacts of COVID-19 as experienced by customers of social enterprises around the world.

Researchers:
Partners:
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
April 2020 - ongoing
Results Status:
Results

Little is known about the effects of large cash transfers in contexts of protracted displacement. This includes the influence of cash transfers on health behaviors during shocks such as the COVID-19 pandemic. IDinsight plans to develop evidence in this area by building on an on-going impact evaluation of GiveDirectly’s unconditional cash transfer program in Kiryandongo refugee settlement, Uganda.

Study Type:
Qualitative Research, Randomized Evaluation
Study Timeline:
June-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
Mini-Report (Round 1 of 3):
  • Respondents were well-informed about key COVID-19 symptoms and protective behaviours.
  • Most respondents had access to water, soap, and masks to prevent contraction of COVID-19.
  • Most households reported experiencing increased food prices, job loss, business closure, or increases in prices of business or farm inputs between March and July 2020. Respondents also reported difficulties in accessing food. During this same time, food prices were elevated and monthly food and cash rations had been decreased. 
  • Most respondents who needed to access health facilities were able to access them. However, some of the respondents noted challenges such lack of supplies in health facilities and lack of money to afford services or drugs.
  • Most households reported being food insecure in July 2020. However, respondents who received USD 1000 unconditional cash transfer prior to the lockdown had marginally stronger food security than households who were randomly chosen to receive their transfers later and have not yet received them. 
  • Respondents who received USD 1000 unconditional cash transfer prior to the lockdown had higher psychological wellbeing compared to yet-to-receive households. However, most respondents expressed feelings of sadness and fear. These feelings were associated with a lack of resources to provide for their households and fear of contracting COVID-19.
Mini-Report (Round 2 of 3):
  • Respondents reported to have left home 3.2 days a week on average; one-third reported maintaining social distancing each time they left the house. Four-fifths reported wearing masks when out; mask- wearing was 6%-points higher in the treatment group than the control group.
  • We did not detect higher food consumption in households with transfers relative to the control group. Overall weekly household consumption is 118.48 USD PPP (with 7 household members on average.)
  • Respondents most commonly report burglary and water disputes as key community safety and security concerns. More than half of respondents also felt unsafe to go to the market and to fetch water. The majority of respondents (63%) reported that they had experienced, witnessed or heard of burglary (including theft and muggings) occurring in the settlement in the past seven days.
  • Half of the respondents (51%) reported experiencing either quarreling, intimidation, or damaging of personal property among adults in their household while 30% of the households reported experiencing all three dimensions of intra-household conflict in the past seven days.
  • 60 Decibels Logo
  • DFID

While only time can tell what the long-term effects of COVID-19 will be on agricultural supply chains and global food systems, the moment to shape our response is now. Through a project that has been generously funded by FCDO’s Research and Evidence Division, 60 Decibels will survey 500 Kenyan farmers every month between June and December 2020 to understand their experiencing of living through the pandemic and the support they will find useful.

Researchers:
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-December 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
  • Nine in ten farming households report being worse off due to the pandemic. Financial stress is increasing over time.
  • More respondents are reporting a) severe worsening of financial wellbeing - 54% said their situation was ‘much worse’ in September compared to 34% in June, b) loss of income sources - 47% reported losing a source of income in September compared to 31% in June, and c) greater reliance on low risk and stringent coping strategies - use of savings has grown from 59% in June to 80% in September, while the sale of an asset has grown from 11% to 38%.
  • Relaxing of national curfew has meant farmers are making fewer adjustments to their core farming activities - hiring labour, purchasing inputs, harvesting and selling produce. In particular, hired labour has improved from 94% of farmers reporting a decrease in June to only 45% in September. The adjustment that has persisted is the sale of produce - 77% of farmers decreased sales in June and 57% continued to make this adjustment in September.
  • The majority are optimistic for the short rain season. However, the extent of confidence is waning as the rains approach. Only 23% of farmers are ‘very confident’ that they will be able to undertake farm activities as usual next month, compared to 57% in July.
  • Cash remains the top requested support month-on-month as coping strategies get exhausted and financial strife persists. Emergency financial loans could also help farmers cope today and support recovery in the future.
  • Access to affordable inputs. 72% say essential inputs are dearer than usual. Farmers are facing a difficult choice: either purchase less inputs and put their harvest at risk, or purchase at the higher price and risk losing money this season. Localized delivery of, and lenient loans for, high quality inputs would help farming households cope with COVID-19 shocks.
  • Majority of farmers want to sell more but are unable to. Six in ten farmers sold less produce to cope with COVID-19 but only two actively made the choice to do so. The other four wished they could sell more but did not have the option to do so. Farmers are seeking connection to new buyers, market information and transportation support.
  • Digital means are currently underutilized as a support and recovery tool. Despite the potential of digital platforms to provide financial liquidity, increase access to agricultural information, and increase market access, only 36% of farmers (40% women and 32% men) have increased their use of digital products during this pandemic. In fact, 23% decreased their use. Top barriers included farmers not having access to a device, limited trust in digital products, lack of funds to purchase internet/airtime bundles and network-related issues.
  • IPA

Tracking how people’s lives are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic can enable policymakers to better understand the situation in their countries and make data-driven policy decisions. To respond to this need, IPA has developed the RECOVR survey—a panel survey that will facilitate comparisons, document real-time trends of policy concern, and inform decision-makers about the communities that are hardest-hit by the economic toll of the pandemic.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-July 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
 
  • 62% of respondents say they stayed home most days or every day in the last week.
  • 64% of employed individuals have spent fewer hours working for pay/running a business/helping on a family business than they did in a typical week before the government closed schools.
  • 89% of households have received support from the government in response to COVID-19. Of those that are receiving support, 97% are receiving food and 45% are receiving cash.
  • 26% of respondents say they have had to limit portion sizes at meal times more than once in the past week.
  • Respondents cited lack of access to internet, devices, and learning materials as major barriers children will face if schools do not open in August and instead offer distance learning.

Tracking how people’s lives are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic can enable policymakers to better understand the situation in their countries and make data-driven policy decisions. To respond to this need, IPA has developed the RECOVR survey—a panel survey that will facilitate comparisons, document real-time trends of policy concern, and inform decision-makers about the communities that are hardest-hit by the economic toll of the pandemic.

Partners:
Ministry of General Education, Zambia; Ministry of Health, Zambia
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-July 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
Round 1:
  • Over 25% of respondents say they never stayed home in the past week.
  • More than 50% of employed individuals have earned less pay than they did in a typical week before the government closed schools.
  • Over 50% of respondents say they have had to deplete savings to pay for food, healthcare, or other expenses since February 2020.
  • Over 35% of respondents say they have had to limit portion sizes at meal times or reduce the number of meals at least once in the past week.
  • 50% of respondents report their primary school children are spending time on education at home, and over 35% of respondents report their secondary school children are spending time on education at home. 
  • IPA Logo

Tracking how people’s lives are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic can enable policymakers to better understand the situation in their countries and make data-driven policy decisions. To respond to this need, IPA has developed the RECOVR survey—a panel survey that will facilitate comparisons, document real-time trends of policy concern, and inform decision-makers about the communities that are hardest-hit by the economic toll of the pandemic.

Partners:
Rwanda Education Board
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-July 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
Round 1:
  • More than 70% of respondents say they feel their household is at risk of contracting COVID-19. For those who don’t feel at risk, almost 30% report it is because they follow preventive measures.
  • More than 50% of households say they have had to reduce food consumption in the past week.
  • Almost 80% of respondents say they have had to deplete savings to pay for food, healthcare, or other expenses since February 2020.
  • 80% of employed individuals have earned less pay than they did in a typical week before the government closed schools.
  • Households report that 80% of children in primary and secondary school are spending time on education at home since schools were closed.

The COVID-19 pandemic shapes the lives of people around the globe - at the same time, people themselves have the power to shape the pandemic. By employing protective health behavior, such as social distancing, hygiene, mask wearing, and appropriate actions when infected, the population can contribute to alleviating the severity of an outbreak.

Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
March-May 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
 
  • Both knowledge and uptake of protective health behavior are relatively high.
  • Knowledge is the largest explanatory driver of protective health behavior, while socioeconomics and economic preferences are minor determinants.
  • However, knowledge itself is strongly shaped by socioeconomic gradients, being lower in less educated, less wealthy, and rural households.
  • Similarly, information sources predict knowledge and differ significantly by socioeconomic groups.
  • The rural-urban gap prevails across outcomes.

Tracking how people’s lives are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic can enable policymakers to better understand the situation in their countries and make data-driven policy decisions. To respond to this need, IPA has developed the RECOVR survey—a panel survey that will facilitate comparisons, document real-time trends of policy concern, and inform decision-makers about the communities that are hardest-hit by the economic toll of the pandemic.

Partners:
Government of Mexico City
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Study Timeline:
June-July 2020
Results Status:
Results
Key Findings:
 
  • More than 40% of respondents report that they perceive their household to be at risk of contracting COVID-19. For those who do not feel at risk, 70% of respondents report following preventive measures.
  • More than 50% of employed individuals have been paid less (earned less) than in a typical week before schools closed.
  • More than 30% of respondents say they have exhausted their savings to cover essential expenses since February 2020.
  • More than 60% of respondents indicate that they cannot afford the amount of food they used to buy before the pandemic because household income has decreased or because the price of food is now too high.
  • More than 90% of respondents say that primary and secondary school-age children in their household have continued educational activities from home.
  • 45% of respondents perceive that insecurity in their neighborhoods has increased since the beginning of the pandemic.

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