This paper considers whether the COVID-19 stay-at-home order affected crimes targeting women. We use national municipal-level crime data from Mexico’s National Public Security System, which reports sexual crimes, lapses in alimony, domestic violence, and femicides. We track monthly changes in crime using an event-study design. Our results show three main patterns. First, lapses in alimony, sexual crimes, and domestic violence follow a U-shaped trend. Each crime declined and then rose back to their pre-COVID levels. Second, femicides, the most violent crime against women, remained constant during the pandemic. Third, we find that femicides declined in municipalities with alcohol sales prohibition.

Country:
Program Area:
Study Type:
Descriptive / Surveillance
Timeline:
January-July 2019, January-July 2020
Implemented by IPA:
No
Impact Goals:
Improve women’s health, safety, and economic empowerment
Outcomes of Interest:
Crime rates (monthly)
External Website:
Results Status:
Results
Results:
  • Lapses in alimony, sexual crimes, and domestic violence follow a U-shaped trend. Each crime declined and then rose back to their pre-COVID levels.
  • Femicides, the most violent crime against women, remained constant during the pandemic.
  • Femicides declined in municipalities with alcohol sales prohibition.
Key Findings:
 
  • Lapses in alimony, sexual crimes, and domestic violence follow a U-shaped trend. Each crime declined and then rose back to their pre-COVID levels.
  • Femicides, the most violent crime against women, remained constant during the pandemic.
  • Femicides declined in municipalities with alcohol sales prohibition.