Small businesses are often believed to serve as engines for innovation, employment and social mobility, due to their flexibility in responding to new opportunities and their potential for rapid growth. In developing countries, SMEs make up a particularly large part of the economy, yet data suggests that very few small enterprises in developing countries grow into larger businesses.

Country:
Status:
Results

Tax evasion generates significant losses in government revenues and distortions in a country’s economic activities. Evasion is of particular concern in developing countries, where the share of the informal economy is typically larger and the government has limited sources of information. Over the last decade, an increasing number of revenue authorities around the world have started collaborating with academic researchers to rigorously evaluate initiatives aimed at increasing tax revenue.

Country:
Status:
In Progress

Many entrepreneurs in developing countries lack access to even the most basic of financial services. Researchers offered market vendors and bicycle taxi drivers in rural Kenya increased access to formal savings accounts: there was no opening fee, though the account offered no interest and users still had to pay substantial withdrawal fees.

Country:
Status:
Results

Small and medium enterprises in developing countries generally face a number of barriers to expanding their businesses and employing more workers, including limited access to credit and other financial services.

Country:
Status:
In Progress
Fishing boats

The emerging markets of low-income countries are often characterized by uncertainty and instability, weak enforcement of formal contracts, and concentrated market power, making informal contractual relationships especially important. When market structures change, how do those relationships change?

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
Results

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are thought to be important drivers of growth in developing economies, but entrepreneurs in these countries face many barriers, including poor access to training, finance, and business networks. In Colombia, Fundación Bavaria’s “Destapa Futuro” (Open the Future) program identifies promising enterprises and provides them with a suite of financial, technical, business, and training resources.

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
Results

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are thought to be important drivers of growth in developing economies, but entrepreneurs in these countries face many barriers, including access to business training, finance, and business networks. In Bogotá, Colombia, Fundación Bavaria’s “Destapa Futuro” (Open the Future) program identifies promising enterprises and provides them with a suite of financial, technical, business and training resources.

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
In Progress

A simplified financial training based on “rules of thumb” improved business practices and outcomes among microentrepreneurs in the Dominican Republic, while standard, fundamentals-based accounting training produced no significant effect.

Status:
Results

Promoting frequent communication between loan officers and clients can help banks learn about the reliability of existing and potential clients.

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
Results
In recent years, the ready-made garment sector has experienced rapid growth in Bangladesh. While overall, most of these new jobs have gone to women, few of them have been in management. At the same time, firms are under pressure to increase productivity. Researchers are exploring whether a vocational training program can successfully improve productivity and help women advance into management.
Country:
Status:
In Progress

This project develops a credit scoring system that is based on customer transactions rather than a purely characteristics-based screening approach. In developing countries where credit bureau information is often not available or unreliable, transaction-based lending models allow ‘good’ applicants to demonstrate their quality. The project will identify different customer transaction patterns and account usage behaviors and test their predictive power for repayment behavior of SMEs.

Researchers:
Country:
Topics:
Status:
In Progress

In developing countries, women are commonly underrepresented in the formal sector. One potential explanation is that a large proportion of these jobs are secured through informal channels, including employee referrals, which may disadvantage women. Innovations for Poverty Action examined how informal job referral systems affect labor market participation for women in Malawi using a randomized evaluation and found that informal referral schemes systematically disadvantaged qualified women.

Country:
Topics:
Status:
Results

Previous research suggests that in many developing countries businesses are less productive on average than their counterparts in developed countries. Additionally, productivity across firms varies more in developing countries than in developed countries. These market characteristics suggest that the forces of competition, growth, and innovation that tend to drive productivity in developed countries may be weaker in developing countries.

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
In Progress

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are thought to be an important source of innovation and employment in developing countries due to their flexibility in responding to new market opportunities and their potential for growth. However, businesses in developing countries face a number of constraints that may limit their growth and the sector’s contribution to poverty alleviation and long-term economic growth.

Researchers:
Country:
Status:
In Progress

Pages