Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020, July 02, 2020, July 08, 2020, July 14, 2020, July 16, 2020

COVID-19’s wide-ranging health and economic impacts have permeated across the world, and much of the research community has pivoted to respond. At IPA, we have launched a major effort—Research for Effective COVID-19 responses, or RECOVR, to support immediate response efforts and provide evidence to decision-makers working to mitigate the impacts of the crisis in the 22 countries where we work.
Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020, July 02, 2020, July 08, 2020, July 14, 2020, July 16, 2020

COVID-19’s wide-ranging health and economic impacts have permeated across the world, and much of the research community has pivoted to respond. At IPA, we have launched a major effort—Research for Effective COVID-19 responses, or RECOVR, to support immediate response efforts and provide evidence to decision-makers working to mitigate the impacts of the crisis in the 22 countries where we work.
Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020, July 02, 2020, July 08, 2020, July 14, 2020, July 16, 2020

COVID-19’s wide-ranging health and economic impacts have permeated across the world, and much of the research community has pivoted to respond. At IPA, we have launched a major effort—Research for Effective COVID-19 responses, or RECOVR, to support immediate response efforts and provide evidence to decision-makers working to mitigate the impacts of the crisis in the 22 countries where we work.
Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020, July 02, 2020, July 08, 2020, July 14, 2020, July 16, 2020

COVID-19’s wide-ranging health and economic impacts have permeated across the world, and much of the research community has pivoted to respond. At IPA, we have launched a major effort—Research for Effective COVID-19 responses, or RECOVR, to support immediate response efforts and provide evidence to decision-makers working to mitigate the impacts of the crisis in the 22 countries where we work.
Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020

This webinar is part of IPA's RECOVR Webinar Series: Bringing Evidence to COVID-19 Policy Responses in the Global South. Together with our partners, we are using this series to rapidly share what we are learning with the policy and research community to support evidence-informed response efforts. More information about other events in the series is available here. 
Webinar, United States
June 11, 2020, July 02, 2020, July 08, 2020, July 14, 2020, July 16, 2020

COVID-19’s wide-ranging health and economic impacts have permeated across the world, and much of the research community has pivoted to respond. At IPA, we have launched a major effort—Research for Effective COVID-19 responses, or RECOVR, to support immediate response efforts and provide evidence to decision-makers working to mitigate the impacts of the crisis in the 22 countries where we work.
Dhaka, Bangladesh
December 03, 2019

On December 3, IPA, the International Growth Centre (IGC), and Yale University’s Research Initiative on Innovation and Scale (Y-RISE) hosted “Expanding the Evidence for Policy and Interventions in Cox’s Bazar,” a day-long policy workshop discussing research findings on the influx of Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar and how evidence can inform programming and policy.
Washington, DC, United States
October 04, 2019

Recent studies of community security and peacebuilding efforts have found that relatively inexpensive interventions can move the needle on measures of intergroup trust and social capital, even when far more intensive programs have failed to do so. For instance, where community-driven development and reconstruction interventions have delivered disappointing results in terms of rebuilding social capital, alternative, low-cost approaches—including translational justice and social contact—have emerged as promising channels for rebuilding social trust and cohesion following conflict. 
USIP
Washington D.C. , United States
June 07, 2019

Peacebuilding programming and policy is based on assumptions about how development interventions can contribute to peace, but little research has been done to rigorously test these theories of change.
RIDGE LACEA.jpg
Medellín, Colombia
May 23, 2019

On May 23, a panel sponsored by IPA and J-PAL LAC convened the Secretaries of Security from Colombia's three largest cities—Bogotá, Medellín, and Cali—and Universidad EAFIT economist Catalina Goméz Toro to discuss and debate policy strategies for public safety. Sebastian Chaskel, Director of IPA's Peace and Recovery program, moderated the discussion.
New York City, United States
April 18, 2019

Re-integrating former members of armed groups into communities is a growing global policy challenge. In places like northeastern Nigeria, where the extremist group Boko Haram is active, the combination of large-scale campaigns of violence against civilians and radicalization by insurgent groups leads to intense anger and increases mistrust and wariness that members have been irrevocably changed. 
Washington, DC, United States
October 22, 2018 - October 26, 2018

Peacebuilding programming and policy is based on assumptions about how development interventions can contribute to peace, but little research has been done to rigorously test these theories of change. From October 22-26, IPA and J-PAL staff participated in and presented at the Alliance for Peacebuilding's Annual Conference and Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) Solutions Forum in Washington, DC in order to engage practitioners and policymakers in thinking about how to produce and use evidence for peace.
Myanmar Roundtable 9.25.18
Yangon, Myanmar
September 25, 2018

On September 25, IPA Myanmar hosted its first of a series of roundtables to discuss the potential use of impact evaluations for programming and policy across various sectors in Myanmar. This inaugural roundtable focused on governance, conflict, and peace-building, with representatives from 10 organizations in attendance.
New York City, United States
September 12, 2018

When it comes to combating crime and homicide in Latin America—home to 41 of the 50 most dangerous cities—policymakers have few tested tools at their disposal. Does hot spots policing reduce violence in high-crime neighborhoods? How can police become more accountable and trusted in their communities?
Washington, DC, United States
September 07, 2018

During the 2000s, over 1.5 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean were killed, equivalent to 2.5 times the population of Washington, D.C. Most of these homicides were geographically concentrated and can be attributed to urban armed groups. Urban violence imposes significant economic and social costs on the region, yet policymakers and decisionmakers have little evidence and limited tools at their disposal to prevent and control it.

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