Media Coverage
July 18, 2018

Devex reports on the Governance, Conflict, and Crime Initiative (GCCI), a joint IPA and J-PAL initiative that was granted funding through the UK's Department for International Development (DFID). GCCI's goal is to support RCTs piloted through IPA and J-PAL to generate much-needed evidence on solutions to conflict and corruption, particularly in fragile states. Devex outlines some of these pilot evaluations and key takeaways from a London event in early June.

Media Coverage
June 04, 2018

Burkina Faso's L'Economiste features an article about a study done by Malte Lierl and IPA Burkina Faso evaluating the effect of local elections on corruption, social norms, and civic enagement. (Note: in French).

Media Coverage
December 27, 2017

In the Christian Science Monitor, Daniel Grossman explores strategies scientists are pursuing to prevent deforestation and preserve forests' natural ability to sequester carbon and slow the effects of climate change. Grossman interviews Seema Jayachandran about study with IPA showing that paying landowners in Uganda not to cut down endangered trees on their land reduced deforestation. 

Media Coverage
July 20, 2017

NPR's Goats and Soda reports on an IPA Uganda study evaluating the effectiveness of a payments for ecosystem services (PES) program, in which Ugandan landowners were paid to not cut forest trees on their property. Seema Jayachandran, the lead author of the study, and Kelsey Jack, an assistant professor in economics at Tufts University, weigh in on the results of the evaluation.

Media Coverage
July 20, 2017

AFP News covers an IPA Uganda study evaluating the effectiveness of a payments for ecosystem services (PES) program, in which Ugandan landowners were paid to not cut forest trees on their property. Seema Jayachandran, the lead author of the study, and Annie Duflo, Executive Director of IPA, reflect on the results of the evaluation.

Media Coverage
January 24, 2017

Colombia’s largest newspaper, El Tiempo, reports on an IPA study in Bogotá. The study is the largest RCT of its kind, and shows that hotspot policing and municipal services can reduce crime. [In Spanish]

El periódico más grande de Colombia, El Tiempo, informa sobre una evaluación de IPA en Bogotá. La investigación es la evaluación aleatorizada más grande de este tema, y muestra que es posible que patrullaje policial y servicios municipales concentrado en zonas críticas pueda reducir crimen.

Media Coverage
January 24, 2017

Hear researcher Santiago Tobón on Colombia’s Caracol Radio discussing new findings on crime reduction at the link below. [In Spanish]
 
Escucha al investigador Santiago Tobón en Caracol Radio de Colombia, discutiendo los resultados sobre reduccion de cimen en el enlace de abajo.

Media Coverage
January 23, 2017

RCN radio reports on our new results from Colombia on reductions in crime from hotspot policing and municipal services. [In Spanish]

Radio RCN informa sobre nuestros resultados nuevos desde Colombia sobre reducciones en crimen debidas a intensificación en patrullaje policial y recolección de basuras e iluminación.

Media Coverage
January 23, 2017

Colombia’s Caracol Radio reports on the presentation of IPA’s new findings from Bogata, on reducing insecurity by 20% using hotspot policing and city services to clean up neighborhoods. [In Spanish]

Radio Caracol en Colombia informa sobre la presentación de los resultados nuevos de IPA en Bogotá. Los resultados precisan una reducción de de 20% de la inseguridad a través de un aumento en patrullaje policial y la recolección de basura y el mejoramiento del alumbrado público en zonas críticas.

Media Coverage
August 12, 2016

Fast Company discusses the findings from our study in Uganda on using cash transfers to preserve carbon-absorbing trees. Read more in the story "Trees Stop Climate Change—Can We Pay People To Stop Cutting Them Down?"

Media Coverage
August 10, 2016

Rural demand for electricity connections is significantly lower than the Kenyan government predicted, even when connection costs are highly subsidised, according to economists at the University of California, Berkeley.

July 26, 2016

By Arthur Sagot-Duvauroux

It takes time for an organization to influence policy decisions. It requires rigorous work to be trusted as a professional and high-quality organization. Relationships need to be established and expanded to the point that decision makers listen and solicit your opinion.

How can you secure such relationships when in just over a year the country goes through a popular uprising, a transitional government, a coup d’état, and democratic elections?

On October 2014, a popular uprising broke out in Burkina Faso, forcing M. Blaise Compaore to resign...

Media Coverage
July 06, 2016

The Washington Post reports on our study in Uganda, testing the effectiveness of paying landowners not to cut down trees. Read more in the article, "A cheap, simple experiment just found a very effective way to slow deforestation."

Media Coverage
July 05, 2016

Rachel Glennerster writes in Burkina Faso's L'Economiste about her research with IPA in Sierra Leone on how knowledge of candidates affects voters. (Note: in French)

Media Coverage
November 10, 2015

Political debates are good even when they’re bad. Even when candidates are cringe-worthy, they’re cringe-worthy in public view. And voters learn about all the candidates, not just new ones. In the United States, for example, Hillary Clinton has been center stage in political life for 24 years. Donald Trump is the very definition of “overexposed.” Still, the debates tell us new things about them — their positions, temperament, grace under pressure (or lack thereof), charisma and political skill.

How much more could voters benefit from debates in countries where they know next to...

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