Mobile money
CREDIT: 
Will Boase
October 20, 2010

 

People often find it hard to save money, the poor no less than the better off. Human nature plays its role, of course: it is hard to save for some intangible future when our wants in the present are so concrete. But the poor also lack convenient and inexpensive mechanisms to save. So what could happen if we remove those barriers?

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Michael Kremer, Jessica Leino, Edward Miguel, Alix Zwane
October 15, 2010

Change.org's Blog Action Day is a day of blogs around the world posting about the same issue on the same day with the aim of sparking a global discussion and driving collective action. This year's topic is water.

Two million children die of diarrheal disease each year and contaminated water is often to blame.

Media Coverage
July 08, 2010
"Even lentils can lead to miracles." How research by IPA Research Affiliates focusing on tangible goals is causing a revolution in the way we think about development.
Media Coverage
March 09, 2010
IPA Project Associates Kerry Brennan and Daniel Tello review the findings of two IPA studies that examine the role of sunk costs in decisions about how to provide goods and services to the poor. Many people assume that paying for something will make you more likely to use it, while items given away for free are undervalued and less likely to be used. These seemingly harmless assumptions have a big impact on current debates over how health products should be delivered to the poor.
Media Coverage
January 20, 2010
An article on New Year's Resolutions recognizes the tendency to procrastinate, and offers solutions to address it.  Research on fertilizer yields and usage in Kenya by IPA Research Affiliates Esther Duflo, Michael Kremer, and Jonathan Robinson is mentioned. Commitment contracts in the Philippines, a project by IPA Researchers Xavier Giné, Dean Karlan, and Jonathan Zinman is also mentioned.
Media Coverage
January 04, 2010
Work on the impact of savings in Kenya by IPA Research Affiliates Pascaline Dupas and Jonathan Robinson is mentioned in this article on the importance of saving in the developing world. Nicholas Kristof continues the discussion on his blog.
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CREDIT: 
Camille Boudot & Andre Butler
Pascaline Dupas, Jonathan Robinson
December 31, 2009

Nice article today by Kristof in the New York Times.

Media Coverage
November 30, 2009
Profiles the research and results of IPA Research Affiliates and the Jameel Poverty Action Lab, discussing results from work by Abhijit Banerjee, Rachel Glennerster, Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas, Michael Kremer, Edward Miguel, and Karthik Muralidharan.
Media Coverage
November 20, 2009
Nicholas Kristof mentions the effectiveness of deworming, based on a study by IPA Research Affiliates, in a discussion of changing attitudes towards foreign aid. 
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CREDIT: 
Nolwenn Gontard
Leigh Linden, Edward Miguel, Michael Kremer, Esther Duflo, Rema Hanna
September 11, 2009

It is a difficult and not particularly fruitful debate when different sectors important to economic development are pitted against one another in the quest for donor attention. Lasting development progress usually encompasses many areas, and debates that fail to recognize this are often just distracting.   Some of the more interesting (and no less heated) debates are waged once a specific sector of focus or growth constraint has been identified.

Media Coverage
August 20, 2009
This article on fighting poverty by improving the situation of women in the developing world mentions IPA Research Affiliate Michael Kremer's work in Kenya, and also quotes Research Affiliate Esther Duflo. 
Media Coverage
May 10, 2009
Research Affiliate Esther Duflo writes about the benefits of keeping girls in school and how IPA's Ghana Secondary School Project for Girls works.
Media Coverage
November 17, 2008
Thomas Bossuroy and Clara Delavallade describe how school-based deworming programs dramatically improve child health and education at a low cost.
Media Coverage
August 06, 2006
At a time when millions of people each year are still being infected with the virus that causes AIDS, particularly in Africa, a rigorous new study has identified several simple, inexpensive methods that helped reduce the spread of the disease among Kenyan teenagers, especially girls.

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