Media Coverage
August 26, 2019
PBS NewsHour reported from Ethiopia on IPA's research examining the Ultra-Poor Graduation model, which targets the world's poorest.
Media Coverage
May 29, 2019
Fin24 highlights the complications of providing payments, jobs, and training as a means to help people escape poverty, citing an IPA study in Ethiopia. The study provided young, mostly female, low-skilled job-seekers with either cash-grants or factory jobs. While the intervention had short term effects after one year, they faded after five years.
Media Coverage
November 27, 2018
Vox's Future Perfect writes on the effects of cash transfers compared to holistic "graduation" programs as well as how both approaches can be applied in conjunction with one another.
Media Coverage
October 18, 2018
With the launch of their Future Perfect section, Vox discusses IPA research on cash benchmarking, comparing cash to the multi-faceted "graduation approach" to helping the poorest of the poor. They discuss how this worked in Uganda and a
Workers at a factory in Ethiopia
Workers at a factory in Ethiopia
Media Coverage
April 27, 2017
Chris Blattman and Stefan Dercon wrote an op-ed in The New York Times about the unexpected results from a study we worked on with them in Ethiopia. Together, we tested the conventional wisdom about how factory jobs help bring workers out of poverty, but as they explain: “Little did we anticipate that everything we believed would turn out to be wrong.”
Media Coverage
October 07, 2016
They don’t call economics the dismal science for nothing. A study of Ethiopian workers released last week by the US National Bureau of Economics Research found low-wage factories—often known as sweatshops— were dangerous, undesirable and paid even less than self-employment in the informal sector. But, the researchers concluded, countries were still better off than not having those jobs at all.
Media Coverage
October 06, 2016
The Economist talks about IPA's work in microcredit, flexible repayment loans, and ultra-poor graduation studies.
Media Coverage
September 29, 2016
In the past several decades, manufacturing jobs have fled the developed world for the developing world. Obviously, that’s profoundly reshaped the economies of developing countries like China and Bangladesh. But what does that mean for the ordinary people who are doing the work — often for incredibly low wages?
EthiopiaFactoryJobs.jpg
Press Release
September 26, 2016
   
Media Coverage
November 19, 2015
Stanford Social Innovation Review reports on IPA and our partners' six-country evaluation of the "graduation" approach to helping those who make under $1.25 a day. According to Harvard economist Michael Kremer  "...it’s very encouraging. We’re not going to eliminate extreme poverty by 2030. But we can get most of the way there with the tools that we have available.”
Media Coverage
July 06, 2015
IPA researcher Chris Blattman thoughtfully considers what we know about anti-poverty programs that work, and how to make them better. Specifically, he looks at our research on the Graduation model, the six-pronged approach to helping the poorest of the poor, whose results were recently published in Science.
Media Coverage
June 24, 2015
IPA President and founder Dean Karlan has an op-ed in Reuters titled: New data reveals which approach to helping the poor actually works. He reviews what we know from the 6-country randomized controlled trials published in Science, testing the Graduation approach to helping those who live on less than $1.25 per day.
Media Coverage
May 21, 2015
In The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof writes about IPA's Graduating the Ultra Poor studies recently published in Science.
Press Release
May 14, 2015
May 15, 2015 NEW HAVEN CT - A new six-country study shows a comprehensive approach for the ultra-poor, the approximately one billion people who live on less than $1.25 a day, boosted livelihoods, income, and health. Published in Science (available here), the research tested the effectiveness of an approach known as the “Graduation model” in six countries by following 21,000 of the world’s poorest people for three years.
Press Release
January 21, 2015
January 22, 2015, NEW HAVEN, CT - Microcredit—providing small loans to underserved entrepreneurs—has been both celebrated and vilified as a development tool. Six new studies from four continents bring rigorous evidence to this debate, finding that while microcredit has some benefits, it is not a viable poverty alleviation tool.  

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