Mushfiq Mobarak speaks to reporters about his seasonal migration of laborers study
Media Coverage
July 17, 2016
Professor Ahmed Mushfiq Mubarak of Yale School of Management was recently interviewed by a leading Bangladeshi newspaper ‘The Daily Prothom-Alo’.
Media Coverage
May 18, 2016
A new analysis by economists from Duke University, and MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab examines various strategies to prevent child marriages. It finds that providing financial incentives to delay marriage is most effective.
Media Coverage
May 07, 2016
Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak of Yale University, who has experimented with encouraging Bangladeshi farmers to migrate to cities during the lean season, thinks it unfair to compare carefully tested projects to others where the cost-benefit numbers are “essentially made up”. Binning reliable, low-scoring projects for untested high-scoring ones would be foolish. But if the upshot is more scrutiny for promising projects, the exercise is useful.
Media Coverage
March 28, 2016
In northern rural Bangladesh, the autumn lean season is the most difficult time of year, especially in Rangpur, where close to half of the 15.8 million residents live below the poverty line. The landless poor in Rangpur primarily work as day laborers on neighboring farms. But in September, while waiting for crops to mature in the fields, there is no farm work to be done. Wages fall, and at the same time, food becomes scarce because harvest is still months away, so the price of rice goes up.
Media Coverage
July 31, 2015
"We don’t have any final results yet from our study, which is funded by the World Bank, the SME Finance Forum, the Asian Development Bank, and Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA), a research organization. But here’s what we’ve learned from pilot projects in Bangladesh: Seventy-three percent of workers had a savings goal in mind when they started work.
Media Coverage
April 23, 2015
A new IPA study published in Science tested the effectiveness of a popular sanitation education/promotion program in Bangladesh. The program, in use in 60 countries, had no effect alone but did when combined with subsidies to build latrines.
Media Coverage
April 21, 2015
Research published in Science Magazine last week shows that providing subsidies for the construction of latrines in northwest Bangladesh was more effective than information and motivation programs. Putting the two together produced even better results.
Press Release
April 16, 2015
April 16, 2015, NEW HAVEN, CT – With poor sanitation estimated to cause 280,000 deaths per year worldwide, improving sanitation is a key policy goal in many developing countries. Yet governments and major development institutions disagree over how to address the problem. A new study released in Science today found that in Bangladesh, a community-motivation model that has been used in over 60 countries to increase use of hygienic latrines had no effect, yet latrine coverage expands substantially when that model is combined with subsidies for hygienic latrines targeted to the poor. 
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March 23, 2015
By Konstantin Peric & Jake Kendall
 
Editors Note: Our partner, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has asked us to share this announcement with the financial inclusion community.
 
 
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February 02, 2015
Editor’s note: This cross-post appeared originally on NextBillion.net here.
 
Gharad Bryan, Shyamal Chowdhury, Mushfiq Mobarak
October 22, 2012
 
Editor’s note: Scott Guggenheim is a Social Policy Adviser at AusAID and participated in the Post-Conflict recovery panel at the Impact and Policy Conference held in Bangkok.
 
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Dean Karlan
August 31, 2012
 
This blog was originally posted on the CGAP Microfinance Blog. Click here to see the full post.
 
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Mushfiq Mobarak, Grant Miller, Puneet Dwivedi, Robert Bailis, Lynn Hildemann
July 26, 2012
 
Research by the World Health Organization tells us that indoor air pollution is the single largest risk factor for female mortality. Survey evidence in 2006 indicated that 98 percent of the rural population in Bangladesh cooked with traditional biomass-burning stoves, with women in these areas not perceiving indoor air pollution as a significant health hazard and consequently prioritizing other basic developmental needs.
 
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Gharad Bryan, Shyamal Chowdhury, Mushfiq Mobarak
June 16, 2011

David McKenzie presents the results from a poll amongst young development economists, who were asked about what they view as the most under-researched area in development:

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